Bridge Conventions A-C

June 15, 2008

 bridge baron

Ambiguous Splinters were invented by Marty Bergen (called splinters with relay) and are actually part of his Bergen Raises scheme, although very few people actually play them. The link gives an updated variation of these ambiguous splinters. 

Baby Blackwood is a little known convention that uses a direct jump to 3NT over partner’s major suit opening to ask for aces. The advantage of the convention is when responder has a good hand but no aces – a 4NT ask would then get the side too high if partner has only one ace.

Baron Two No-Trumps is a convention popular in the UK. It is a jump to 2NT over partner’s one-level opening bid that shows a big balanced hand, around 14 or so points. I dont particularly likke the convention. preferring Jacoby 2NT over partner’s major and a natural 11-12 over a minor.

Baron Two Spades is a convention that is popular in the UK. When using Jacoby Transfers, the 2 spades response is idle. It has many conventional meanings and the Baron 2 spades treatment is that it is either an invitational hand inviting 3NT (and having no 4-card major) or else a slam seeking hand. With a minimum, opener should simply bid 2NT which responder will pass with the invitational type hand. With a maximum opener should bid a 4-card minor if he has one just in case responder is looking for a minor suit slam – the sequence is game forcing. When using the Baron 2 spades convention, there is no need for a natural 2NT invitation and this bid is often used to transfer to 3 clubs; responder may then pass with a weak club hand, bid three diamonds to play or bid something else showing a strong hand with clubs.

Baron Three Clubs is a bid of 3 clubs over partner’s 2NT opening. It is game forcing and often slam-seeking; opener and responder then both bid 4-card suits up the line. The convention has the advantage over using 3 clubs as Stayman in that 4-4 minor fits can be located for slam purposes.

Benjamin Twos are popular in the UK, but not so much elsewhere although they are compatible with Standard American and two-over-one as well as Acol. Playing Benjamin twos a 2c opening is strong but not game forcing and a 2d opening is absolutely forcing to game. There are a fer variations of benjamin twos and the link gives my preferred variant.

Besse Puppet Stayman is a slight alteration to Puppet Stayman that ensures the the No Trump opener is always declarer. It is used over a 2NT opening and can also be used over 1NT if your Stayman bid promises invitational or beyyer values.

Bergen Raises are a set of responses to partner’s 1 heart or 1 spade opening. 1NT is forcing (as in the two-over-one system) and all bids at the two and three level are artificial or have a peculiar meaning. In particular, the 3 clubs and 3 diamonds responses are artificial raises of partner’s major. Actually some people (but not me) believe that the meanings of these two bids should be interchanged and this is discussed in the “Inverted Bergen Raises” section in the link.

Blackwood is one of the very first of bridge conventions. A bid of 4NT asks for the number of aces and a subsequent bid of 5NT asks for kings. Most experienced players these days play Roman Keycard Blackwood, where the king of trumps is included along with the aces (thus there are 5 ‘keycards’) and the trump queen is also given special treatment.

BROMAD stands for Bergen Raise Of Major After Double and is similar to the normal Bergen Raises.

Cappelletti is a very common defense to 1NT in North America. 2 clubs is an unspecified single suited hand, two diamonds shows both majors and two hearts/spades shows 5 cards in the minor and 4-5 cards in an unspecified minor.

Checkback Stayman is a convention used by responder when opener rebid 1NT (or 2NT) after responder had replied in a major. A bid of 2 clubs asks opener to define his major suit holdings and his strength.

Compressed Transfers is a very silly convention where after partner’s 1NT opening a bid of 2 diamonds is either a transfer to hearts or a transfer to clubs. Total nonsence in my opinion.

Constructive raise is a convention used by some two-over-one players. A direct raise to two of their major shows a good (constructive) raise and with a weaker raise you go through the Forcing NoTrump.

Crawling Stayman is a very silly convention that is meant to make life  easier when you have a weak hand 5-5 in the majors and partner opens 1NT.

Crowhurst is a convention which enables you to usesa large range (12-16) for you 1NT rebid. Two clubs enquires about the range and also the major suit holdings. I don’t like it and it and prefer checkback Stayman.

Cue bids are generally control showing bids, very often when a trump suit has been agreed.

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Bridge Conventions D-G

June 15, 2008

D and A twos are a complete set (2c, 2d, 2h and 2s) of multi two openings developed by Derek Tyms and Gerard (Ado) Hardy.

The Directional Asking Bid (or DAB) is a convention that asks partner for cover in the suit bid. Using the DAB convention, asker promises a 1/2 stop in the suit and partner should bid NoTrumps if he has a 1/2 stop or better.

Delayed Game Raise is an old-fashioned way to show a sound raise to game of partner’s major. These days people use Jacoby 2NT and/or the Swiss convention.

DODS is a defensive signalling system used by a few players in the UK. It is not really very satisfactory as one frequently does not have the required card for a specific signal.

DOPI (Double zero pass one) is a convention used when your Blackwood or Gerber bid has been overcalled. ROPI  is  is used when the asking bid is doubled. A similar convention is DEPO (and REPO) where double (or redouble) shows an even number and pass shows an odd number.

DONT (Disturbing Opponents’ No Trump) is a convention, popular in North America, to intefere when the opponent’s open 1NT. It is not really suitable against a weak no trump ad double is not for penalties.

Drury is a convention, popular in North Ameica, that uses two clubs (and also two diamonds in some variants) to show a sound raise to three of partner’s major opening when responder is a passed hand. It is especially useful if partner has opened light in 3rd seat.

Dutch Acol is my name for the system played in Holland (and also popular in Australia and Scandinavia) that involves using 4-card majors in conjunction with a strong NoTrump.

Exclusion Blackwood (probably better called Exclusion Roman Keycard Blackwood) is a convention used to ask about keycards outside a specific suit (because the asker has a void). The asking bid is a jump to the five level of the void suit when trumps are agreed and 4NT would have been Roman Keycard Blackwood. The normal step responses are given but the ace (and king) of the exclusion suit are not included.

Fishbein is an antiquated defence to pre-empts that has double as penalties and the nect suit up as take-out.

Fit Jumps are used by many experienced players whan partner opens one of a major and RHO overcalls or doubles.

Flannery two diamonds is a conventional opening of two diamonds that shows 11-15 points and precisely 4 spades and 5 hearts. It is possibly a bit extravagent to use the bid to show this one specific hand type but the convention does fit in well with the two-over-one system where this shape is difficult over a forcing 1NT from partner.

The Flint convention was a fore-runner to Jacoby Transfers. Over a 1NT opening 2 clubs was Stayman and two diamond was a weak hand with a 5-card major suit. The convention has now been superceeded by Jacoby Transfers.

Forcing NoTrump is a part of the two-over-one bidding system. If you are an unpassed hand and partner opens one heart/spade then 1nT by you is forcing. It can be literally any distribution but is typically between 5 and 12 points.

Four-way transfers are an extention of Jacoby transfers over partner’s 1NT opening. In addition to the well-known two diamonds/hearts transfers; two spades and 2NT are also transfers, to clubs and diamonds respectively. These transfer bids may be any strength, weak, invitational or strong.

Fourth Suit Forcing is a common convention that asks partner to describe his hand further. The first priority for partner is to bid NoTrumps if he has a stop in the 4th suit.

Fruit Machine Swiss is a conventional raise of partner’s 1-level major suit opening. It is a bit out-dated now and has been superceeded by the Keycard Swiss convention. Swiss used to be very popular in the UK but has declined as the use of Jacoby 2NT has become more popular. Actually, I advocate the use of both – with Jacoby 2NT promising around 16+ points and Swiss being used with weaker hands of 12-15 points.

The Gambling Three NoTrumps is an excellent use of the 3NT opening. It promises a 7-8 card completely solid minor suit with no ace or king outside.

There are numerous variations of the Stayman convention, but the most popular is Garbage Stayman. Playing this variant, responder does not guarantee any values whatsoever – he just has to be able to cope with any of the normal 2 diamonds, 2 hearts or two spades responses. Typical shapes are 54xx, 45xx, 4450 and 4441.

Gerber is used for askin partner for the number of aces held. Many people use Gerber only directly over a 1NT or 2NT opening, others use it when partner’s last bid was in NoTrumps. For a complete scenario of when 4 clubs is Gerber (or something else) and when 4NT is Blackwood (or something else) see the link Blackwood or Gerber?

Ghestem is a convention for showing two-suited overcalls. All 6 conbinations are catered for but the three club jump overcall has to be used in a conventional sense (to show the highest two unbid suits).

GNATS (God Not Another Transfer System) is a bidding system where every 1-level opening bid is artificial.

The Good-Bad 2NT convention is a variation of Lebensohl used in some competitive auctions. It is really best left to experienced partnerships.

Granville is a convention used by some two-over-one players where the responses of 1 spade and a forcing 1NT over a 1 heart opening are reversed.

Bridge Conventions H-L

June 15, 2008

Hamilton is a convention for overcalling the opponent’s 1NT opening. Two clubs shows a single suited hand (any suit), two diamonds shows both majors, two hearts and two spades show the major bid plus an unspecified minor suit. The convention is better known as Cappelletti and is also known as Pottage (mainly in the UK).

Help-suit game tries are used after a pair have agreed a suit at the two level. A bid of a new suit asks partner to bid game if he has help in the suit bid.

Helvic is a wriggle to try to find a fit after your (usually weak) 1NT opening has been doubled.

Inverted Minors. Many players have no method of raising partner’s minor suit opening as forcing. Using inverted minors a direct raise to two is forcing (to at least 2NT or 3 of the minor) and a direct raise to three is weak.

Jacoby Transfers are usually bids of two diamonds or two hearts  in response to partner’s 1NT opening to show 5+ hearts and spades resp. They can also be used a level higher over partner’s 2NT opening.

There are a few variations of Jacoby transfers to the minors. The simplest is that 2S demands that partner bids 3C and then responder, with a weak hand, either passes or bids 2D to play.  But the best scheme, for more advanced players, is 4-way transfers that allow for a transfer to a specific minor and may be made with weak or strong hands.

The Jacoby Two NoTrumps is a conventional raise of partner’s one level major suit opening. It promises 4 card support, at least opening values, and no shortage (else splinter).

The Jordan Two NoTrump, also known as the Truscott 2NT is a conventional bid of 2NT after partner has opened one of a major and RHO doubles. 2NT then shows a sound raise to 3 of the major or better. The Jordan 2NT may also be used over a minor suit opening.

Journalist leads are a specific set of opening leads devised for defending against No Trump contracts.

The Jump Cue Bid Overcall is best used to show a long totally solid minor with stoppers in the twi unbid suits and invites partner to bid 3NT if he has a stopper in the suit bid.

Kickback is a variation of Roman Keycard Blackwood invented by Marty Bergen. Instead of 4NT as the keycard  it is four of the suit above trumps – 4NT if spades are trumps. Responses are the same step as normal – either 0314 0r 1430  but ther is no advantage in playing 1430 as there is always room for the trump queen ask.

The Kokish Relay is a great and under-rated convention if you have only one strong opening bid (i.e. 2c). One of my personal hates is to have to rebid 3NT to show a 26+ balanced hand – partner, who is almost sure to be nearly bus, has no idea whether to bid Stayman or transfer as you may then end up in 4NT-1! The kokish relay solves this, read up on it.

The Landy Defence to 1NT is a basic and easy to remember defence. Two clubs shows both majors (should be a least 5-4  or 4-5) and all other suit bids are natural.

Lavinthal is a popular defensive signalling convention. When discarding, you throw from a suit that you do not want and a high card asks for the higher of the two remaing suits, a low card asking for the lower. Lavintal is also used when you give partner a ruff and wish to show him which suit to return to you.

The Law of Total Tricks is a rule of thumb made popular by Larry Cohen and Marty Bergen. In its simplest form is\t says that in a competitive auction with points roughlt even, one should compete to the level of total trumps held by your side.

Leaping Michaels is a part of a defence to a weak two major suit opening. A jump to 4 of a minor shows a decent hand with 6 cards in the minor and 5 cards in the unbid major.

Lebensohl is a great convention. It is an artificial bid of 2NT in competitive auctions and its main use is is when partner’s 1NT opening has been overcalled. Other less well known uses are Lebensohl after partner has reversed and Lebensohlwhen partner has doubled a weak two bid.

The Losing Trick Count – LTC, is a hand evaluation method generally used when a 4-4 major suit fit has been found.

Bridge Conventions M-R

June 15, 2008

The McKenny suit preference signal is a defensive signalling system, also known as Lavinthal. You discard from a suit that you don’t like and a high card asks for the highest ranking of the remaing two suits and a low card asks for the lower ranking. The convention is also used when you lead a card that you know that partner is going to ruff – the size of the card led indicates which suit he should lead back to you.

The Michaels cue bid is a pre-emptive convention to show a two suited hand after an opponent has opened at the one level. A direct cue bid shows the two highest unbid suits. The convention is usually used in conjunction with the Unusual NoTrump (UNT) so that most two-suited combinations can be shown. Note that although Michaels/UNT are basically pre-emptive bids, some more experienced players play that they may also be very strong.

The Mini-Roman two diamonds is an opening 2D bid to show any three suited hand. The point range is around 11-14.

The Mini Splinter is generally a jump in a new suit at the three level after partner has opened with one of a major. It agrees trumps, shows shortage but is not game forcing. Of course, if you play mini-splinters then you cannot play weak jump shifts.

Minor Suit Stayman is generally a bid of 2S over partner’s 1NT opening and asks for a 4-card minor. I don’t like the convention but two variations are discussed in the link.

The Muiderberg convention  is a Dutch treatment for 2h and 2s opening bids. The bids are pre-emptive and show 5 cards in the suit bid and 5-6 cards in an unspecified minor. The convention is best used in conjunction with the Multi two Diamonds  convention to enable weak 6-card majors to be shown. Muiderberg differs from Lucas twos in that the second suit must be a minor (Lucas twos allow for both majors).

Multi Landy is a popular defense to 1NT in Europe. 2c = both majors; 2d = a long 6 card major; 2h = 5 h’s + a minor; 2s – 5 s’d + a minor. If you/partner have opened the 1NT, then you need to know the defense to Multi Landy. Multi Landy is very similar to the Cappelletti defense that is popular in the USA and the differences and advantages/disadvantages are given in Cappelletti or Multi Landy?

The Multi two diamonds is an opening bid of two diamonds that may have various meanings. Weak 6-card suit in either major are usually two of the alternatives, often with one or two additional strong options. If you play this convention, then you need to know what to do when your Multi two diamonds is interfered with, check the link. Also, if the opponents play the Multi, the you need to know a defense to the Multi two diamonds.

Namyats is a convention that uses opening bid of 4c and 4d in addition to 4h and 4s to describe hands with a good long major suit. The direct 4h or 4s bid is pre-emptive whereas 4c and 4d sho good opening bids of 4h and 4s (about 8 playing tricks).

The Negative Double is a convention used when partner has opened with a one level bid and RHO has overcalled. Double is best used to show the unbid major. There are various treatments, see the link.

New Minor Forcing (NMF) is used after partner has opened, you have responded with one of a major and partner rebids 1NT. A bid of 2 of an unbid minor promises at least invitational values and asks partner to define his major suit holdings and strength. The convention can also be used over a 2NT rebid but the PARROT convention is far superior.

Niemeijer is a complete scheme of responses, devised in Holland, to a two No trump opening.

Odds and Evens  is a discard signalling system. Basically, an odd card says that you like the suit and an even card shows dislike.

Ogust is a conventional bid of 2NT when partner has opened with a weak two bid. It asks if partner is min/max and also if he has his points in or outside of his suit. The convention may also be used in the situation where you open the bidding and partner makes a weak jump shift at the two level.

PARROT – Puppet And Relay Responses to a jump Two no-trump rebid, is a combination of the ideas of the Wolff sign off and New Minor Forcing that enables a complete set of responses – sign off in 3d or 3 of a major or completely describe major suit distributions.

Puppet Stayman asks partner for both 4 and 5 card majors after a 1NT or 2NT opening. The drawback of this convention over 1NT is that responder must have at least invitational values and so you cannot play garbage Stayman.

Questem is a scheme for two suited overcalls. It is similar to Ghestem but allows for the direct cue bid of one of a minot toshow both majors, as with the Michaels cue bid.

Quest Transfers are a dramatic improvement on the space-consuming Smolen convention, alloowing for both invitational and game forcing hhands. They are best used in conjunction with 4-way transfers and the agreement that a transfer to a minor followed by a major is natural.

When partner uses RKCB and you have a useful void, then you need to know the responses to Roman Keycard Blackwood with a void.

Responding to partner’s strong two club opening details the treatment where two hearts is negative and two diamonds is waiting.

Responding to partner’s weak two opening. RONF (raise only non-forcing) is standard, with any new suit bid forcing. 2NT asks for a feature as standard but a popular convention is Ogust which asks how good partner’s weak two is.

REVAN is a very silly signalling system:

2,3,4 of a black suit            –        the other black suit

2,3,4 of a red suit               –        the other red suit

5,6,7 of any suit                  –        that suit

8,9,10 of a minor suit          –        the other minor suit

8,9,10 of a major suit          –        the other major suit

A reverse is a bid in a suit that is higher ranking than the suit you previously bid and forces partner to bid at the three level in order to give preference. A reverse may be made by opener or responder and always shows mor cards in the first bid suit.

Revolving Discards are very similar to Lavinthal/McKenny. A discard from a suit shows dislike for that suit and a high card asks for the next suit up (clubs being above spades) and a low card asks for the next suit down (spades being below clubs).

Roman Key Card Blackwood is the variant of Blackwood that is most popular among more experienced players. It differs from basic Blackwood in that the king of trumps is included along with the four aces so that there are five ‘keycards’. The queen of trumps is also given special significance.

The Roman two diamonds convention is an opening bid of two diamonds to show any three-suiter hand. There are numerous variations and the point count may be anything you like.

The Rosenkrantz convention is used when LHO opens, partner overcalls, and RHO bids or makes a negative double. A simple raise to the two level by you shows support but lacking a top honour (A,K,Q) whereas a double (or redouble) shows the same level of support but promises a top honour. The link actually describes reverse Rosenkrantz in which the meanings are reversed.

The Rule of 2,3,4 is a set of guidelines, developed by Ely Culbertson, to aid you in kinowing how high to pre-empt depending upon the vulnerability of both parties.

The Rule of 11 is a mathematical rule that enables the defender not on lead to assertain declarer’s high cards in the suit partner led against a no trump contract when playing fourth best leads.

The Rule of 15 is a guideline as to whether to open or not in fourth seat. You add up your points and the length of your spade suit and if the answer is 15 or more, then open.

The Rule of 20 is a guideline as to whether to open or not in first or second seat. You add up your points and add the lengths of your two longest suits and if the answer is 20 or more, then open.

Bridge Conventions S-T

June 15, 2008

The Sandwich NoTrump is a variation on the Unusual NoTrump. The Sandwich NoTrump occurs when LHO opens at the one level and RHO responds at the one level. Holding a traditional 1NT overcall (15-17) it’s best to pass as partner is sure to be bust. So a 1NT bid here (in the  ‘sandwich’ seat) is unusual in nature – showing a weak distributional hand at least 5-5 in the two unbis suits.

SARS – Shape Asking Relays after Stayman is a conventuon used after Stayman has been used and it asks the 1NT opener to describe his distribution. In particular, minor suit fits can be found and the convention is far superior to any form of Minor Suit Stayman.

The Semi-forcing NoTrump is an offshoot from the forcing NoTrump as played in the two-over-one system. In my opinion is is simply a ‘convention’ for people who dither and cannot make up their mind. The solution is simple, play a forcing NoTrump by a non-passed hand and a traditional 6-10 No trump by a passed hand.

The Smith Echo is a signalling device used when defending against a NoTrump contract.

Smolen is an American convention to show a game-forcing 5-4 or 4-5 in the majors after partner has opened 1NT and responded 2d to your 2c Stayman bid. It is not totally satisfactory, wasting  a lot of bidding space, and has been superceeded by Quest transfers which also cater for invitational hands.

Splinters are an unnecessary jump in response to partner’s last suit bid – it agrees his last bid suit as trumps and shows shortage (singleton or void) in the suit bid. Advocates of Marty Bergen and Bergen Raises may be interested in Ambiguous Splinters  but these would have to be agreed.

Splinters after Stayman or transfers  are not a widely used treatment, to start with, 4c is generally used as an ace or keycard ask and so a club splinter is not available. However, the link gives a neat scheme of ambiguous splinters that are a vey useful convention.
The Staveley Wriggle is an escape mechanism for when your weak 1NT opening gets doubled.
Stayman is one of the very first bridge convention you learn. It is a bid od two clubs over partner’s 1NT opening that asks partner for 4-card majors. There are a few variants og the convention and the most popular is probably Garbage Stayman.
Stayman in Doubt is a conventional bid of 3d when partner has opened 1NT, you bid 2c Stayman, and partner responds in a major. In the original variant the 3d bid showed game values with four card support and a totally flat 44333 or 3433 hand. The convention has now been re-vamped – Advanced Stayman in Doubt (ASID) and is a powerful tool in modern No Trump bidding.
Stayman super-accepts are an extension of Garbage Stayman. Normally only responses of 2d, 2h or 2s are allowed when playing Garbage Stayman, but the link shows that some super-accepts  with bids of 2NT through to 3s are sound with the right hand type.
Strong twos are a fundamental part of the basic Acol bidding system. 2d, 2h and 2s opening are strong and forcing, promising 8-9 playing tricks. These days few people play strong twos, prefering weak twos or something more complicated such as Benjamin Twos combined with weak twos in the majors or the Multi Two Diamonds combined with Muiderberg twos.
The Support Double is used when you open, partner responds with one of a major, and RHO overcalls. A double by you shows three card support for partner’s major. Similarly, if RHO doubles then a Support Redouble shows three card support.
South African Texas Transfers are bids of 4c and 4d over partner’s 1NT opening that demand that he bids 4h or 4s resp.
Swiss is a convention, popular in the UK, that uses conventional bids of 4c and 4d over partner’s one-of-a-major opening to show a sound raise to the four level of partner’s major and 12-15 points.
Tartan Twos are opening bids of 2h or 2s that may be a weak two-suiter or else a strong bid in the suit opened.
A Trial Bid is another name for a help-suit=game try.
Truscott is a defense to a strong 1 club opening, it may also be used over a strong two club opening.
 
The Truscott Two NoTrump convention, also known as Jordan 2NT, is used when partner’s one level suit opening is doubled by the next player. 2NT is not needed in a natural sense as with that hand type you would redouble. So 2NT is artificial and shows a soun raise to three or more of partner’s suit. 
TWERB (Two Way Exclusion Relay Bids) is a defence to a strong 1 club opening (and may also be used over 2 clubs). The bid of a suit at any level shows either that suit of the two suits above (cluba are above spades). A non-touching two suiter is shown by a No-trump bid and double shows 16+.

Bridge Conventions U-Z

June 15, 2008

The Unusual No Trump (UNT) is a conventional bid (usually of 2NT but it can be at different levels) that generally shows the two lowest unbid suits (at least 5-5). It is usually pre-emptive but many play that it can also be very strong. The UNT is usually played in conjunction with the Michaels cue bid and both conventions are fully explained in the link.

The Unassuming Cue Bid is a bid of the opponent’s suit after partner has overcalled. It usually shows a sound raise to three or more of partner’s suit, with the direct raise being pre-emptive.

Walsh is a convention used when partner opens 1 club. Playing Walsh, responder will always respond with a 4-card major if he has one if he has a weak hand, even if this by-passes a 4 or 5 card diamond suit. If responder has invitational or better values then he will bid a diamond suit if he has one and reverse into a 4-card major next go. If the bidding has started 1 club – 1diamond, then opener will bid 1NT with 12-14 points even if he has one or two 4-card majors. The point is that partner will bid a major next go if he has one. One major advantage of playing Walsh is that if opener does indeed end up as declarer in a NoTrump contract after a sequence 1C – 1D – 1NT then the defence has no idea if he has a 4-card major or not.

Walsh Relays are a silly convention where a 2h ‘transfer’ over partner’s 1NT opening is not a transfer if responder subsequently bids 2s. Totally ridiculous.

Weak Jump Shifts–  are becoming quite popular these days. Traditionally when partner opened and you made a jump in a new suit, then that showed a good opening hand with a very good suit. But that scenario does not come up that often and so most experienced players play that the jump shit shows a six or seven card suit and about 2-5 points; i.e a hand too weak to respond normally.

Weak twos are the norm these days and are played by the majority of players. The show about 6-9 points and a six card suit. Weak twos in hearts and spades are almost universal but 2d is often used to show other hand types such as Flannery two diamonds, Multi two diamonds and Benjamin twos. See also Defense to weak twos.

Weissberger is a silly convention that shows an invitational or forcing 5-5 or 5-4 in the majors opposite partner’s 1NT opening. It is briefly dismissed in the No Trump Bidding book.

The Western cue bid is a bid of the opponent’s suit that asks partner to bid NoTrumps if he has a stopper.

The Wolff Sign Off is a bid of 3c after partner has opened and made a jump rebid of 2NT. It requests that partner bid ec which the Wolff bidder will either pass or bid a suit at the three level to play. The convention has been superceeded by the PARROT convention which incorporates the assets of both the Wolff sign off and New Minor Forcing.

Bridge Books

May 9, 2008

There are thousands of bridge card game books around and some of the best are reviewed in the links.

bridge book reviews page 1 :

25 basic bridge conventions you should know by Barbara Seagram and Marc Smith

Play of the Hand by Louis H Watson.

Standard Bidding with SAYC by Ned Downey and Ellen Pomer.

The Complete Book of Bols Bridge Tips, edited by Sally Brock

Fit For A King by Sally Brock and Barry Rigal

Roman Keycard Blackwood by Eddie Kantar

Bridge Conventions in Depth by Matthew and Pamela Granovetter

Bergen for the Defense by Marty Bergen

Declarer Play the Bergen Way by Marty Berge

More Declarer Play the Bergen Way by Marty Bergen

At The Table by Bob Hamman

Godfrey’s Stairway to the Stars by George Rosenkranz and Phillip Alder

Godfrey’s Bridge Challenge by George Rosenkranz and Phillip Alder

Natural Precision by Rick Brown

Precision Today by David Berkowitz

The New Awakening: An Improved Bidding System In Bridge by Bob Gish

Precision Bridge by Eric Jannersten

To Bid or Not To Bid by Larry Cohen

Following the Law by Larry Cohen

Probabilities & Alternatives in Bridge by Gianni Barracho and Antonio Vivaldi

Matchpoint Tricks by B. Axelsen and Villy Dam

Preempts from A to Z by Ron Anderson and Sabine Zenkel

The Definitive Guide to No Trump Bidding by Terrence Quested

bridge book reviews page 2 :

Bid better, Play better by Dorothy Hayden Truscott

Bridge Secrets by Andrew Robson

The Times: Common mistakes and how to avoid them by Andrew Robson

Bridge’s Strangest Hands by Andrew Ward

I Love This Game by Sabine Auken

Easy Guide to Five Card Majors by Sally Brock

Five card Major Bidding in Contract Bridge by Harold Feldheim

Better Bidding with Bergen by Marty Bergen

Better Bidding with Bergen 2: The Contested Auction by Marty Bergen

52 Great Bridge Tips by David Bird

Another 52 Great Bridge Tips by David Bird

52 Great Bridge Tips in Declarer Play by David Bird

Competitive Bidding in Modern Bridge by Edgar Kaplan

Bridge: Defending Together by Freddie North

100 Winning Duplicate Tips by Ron Klinger

Adventures in Card Play by Geza Ottlik and Hugh Kelsey

100 Bridge Problems by Mike Cappelletti

Practical Slam Bidding by Ron Klinger

To Win at Bridge: Have You Got What it Takes? by Ron Klinger

Logic, Intuition and Instinct at the Bridge Table by R Jayaram

Moments of Truth at the Bridge Table by R Jayaram

Serendipity in Bridge by R Jayaram

Partnership Agreements by Clarke Fairbrother

bridge book reviews page 3 :

The Hands of Time: The Most exciting Bridge Deals Ever by Zia Mahmood and David Bird

Great Hands I Almost Played by Sally and Raymond Brock

Masterpieces of Declarer Play by Julian Pottage

The Bridge Philosopher by James S. Kauder

The Return of the Bridge Philosopher by James S. Kauder

The Jack Who Would Be King: To Life Master and Beyond by Jim Kaplan

Bridge: Defense at trick one by David Weiss

The Monster Book of Basic Declarer Play by Dave Huggett and Stephen Cashmore

Points Smoints by Marty Bergen

More Points Smoints by Marty Bergen

Private Sessions – A Bridge Education by Augie Boehm

Demom Defense and Demon Doubling by Augie Boehm

Conventions Today by Brian Senior

Expert Tuition for Tournament Bridge by Sally and Raymond Brock

25 Ways to be a Better Defender by Barbara Seagram and David Bird

25 Ways to Compete in the Bidding by Barbara Seagram and Marc Smith

25 Ways to to Take More Tricks as Declarer by Barbara Seagram and David Bird

25 Bridge Myths Exposed by David Bird

Bridge Cardplay Made Easy: A Textbook for Bridge Classes by David Bird

Bridge Squeezes Interpreted by Raymomd Semp

bridge book reviews page 4 :

Bridge In The Menagerie by Victor Mollo

Bridge in the Fourth Dimension by Victor Mollo

Masters and Monsters by Victor Mollo

You Need Never Lose at Bridge by Victor Mollo

Destiny at Bay by Victor Mollo

The Hog in The 21st Century by Phillip and Robert King

Winning Bridge in the Menagerie by Victor Mollo and Robert King

Bridge in the Fifth Dimension by Robert King, Phillip King and Victor Mollo

Murder in the Menagerie by Robert King, Phillip King and Victor Mollo

Kosher Bridge by David Bird and Ron Klinger

The Rabbi’s Magic Trick: More Kosher Bridge by David Bird and Ron Klinger

Frank Stewart’s Bridge Club by Frank Stewart

Grand Slam by Susan Moody

King of Hearets by Susan Moody

Death Takes a Hand by Susan Moody

Doubled in Spades by Susan Moody

Tickets to the Devil by Richard Powell

Death by Contract by Shirley Presberg

Having Nun, Partner? by Martin Hoffman and David Bird

Fisheads by William Cole

bridge book reviews page 5 :

The Kings’ Tales by Philip and Robert King

The New Kings’ Tales Philip and Robert King

Contract Killers by Robert & Philip King

The Bridge Adventures of Robin Hood by David Bird

Robin Hood’s Bridge Memoirs by David Bird

Farewell, My Dummy by Phillip and Robert King

The Principles of Restricted Talent and other Bridge Stories by Danny Kleinman

Persistent Human Bridge Errors by Danny Kleinman

Murder at the Bridge Table by Matthew Granovetter

I Shot My Bridge Partner by Matthew Granovetter

The Bridge Team Murders by Matthew Granovetter

The Great Bridge Conspiracy by Terry Quinn

Takeout Double by Jim Priebe

Double Elimination by Jim Priebe

Samurai Bridge: A Tale of Old Japan by Robert F. Mackinnon

Richelieu Plays Bridge by Robert F. Mackinnon

Bridge Out of School by Bill Townsend

How To Play Bridge with your Spouse… and Survive! by Roselyn Teukolsky

Gamesman Bridge by Eddie Kantar

Right Through the Pack by Darvas & De vere Hart

Back Through the Pack by Julian Pottage

Right Through the Pack Again by Ron Klinger

Around the World in 80 Hands by Zia Mahmood

Tales Out of School by David Silver and Tim Bourke

A Study in Silver by David Silver and Tim Bourke

Bridge: The Silver Way by David Silver and Tim Bourke

The Naked Bridge Player and Other Stories by David Silver and Tim Bourke

The Fall of the Cards by Donald Parson

Bridge Below the Belt by Larry Cohen and Liz Davis

The Wei of Good Bridge by Kathie Wei-Sender and Martin Hoffman

Go Ahead, Laugh by Jude Goodwin

Play it Again, Slam by Phillip and Robert King

Kempson on Contract: How to Win at Contract Bridge by Ewart Kempson

bridge book reviews page 6 :

Miracles of Card Play by David Bird and Terence Reese

Unholy Tricks by David Bird and Terence Reese

Doubled and Venerable by David Bird and Terence Reese

Cardinal Sins by David Bird and Terence Reese

Divine Intervention by David Bird and Terence Reese

The Abbot and the Sensational Squeeze by David Bird

Saints and Sinners by David Bird

Heavenly Contracts by David Bird

The Abbot’s Great Sacrifice by David Bird

All Hands on Deck by David Bird

Bridge Over Troubled Waters by David Bird

Bridge With a Feminine Touch by David Bird and Simon Cocheme

Bachelor Bridge: The Amorous Adventures of Jack O’Hearts by David Bird and Simon Cocheme

The Adventures of Jenny Mae, Bridge pro by Martin Hoffman and Matthew Granovetter.

Tops and Bottoms by Matthew and Pamela Granovetter

Bridge at the Movies by John Cook

Movie Guide for Bridge Players by Pamela Granovetter

Low Bridge and Punk Pungs by Sam Hellman

Sherlock Holmes, Bridge Detective by George Gooden

Sherlock Holmes, Bridge Detective Returns by Frank Thomas

Our Man Godfrey: Tales From the Bridge Table by George Rosenkranz

The Bridge Player Who Laughed by Ron Klinger

A Funny Thing Happened On Our Way to a Slam by Joy Schic

bridge book reviews page 7 :

Marty Sez… vol 1,2,3 by Marty Bergen

Bridge Squeezes for Everyone by David Bird

Maastricht Challenge Bridge Problems by Tim Bourke

Inspired Card Play by David Bird and Martin Hoffman

Over Your Shoulder: Learn From the Experts by Tony Forrester and Brian Senior

Reading the Cards by David Bird and Marc Smith

The Bridge Bum: My Life and Play by Alan Sontag

Canada’s Bridge Warriors by Roy Hughes

Playing with the Bridge Legends by Barnet Shenkin

Off-Road Declarer Play by David Bird

Leading Questions in Bridge by Sally Brock

Bridge for the Connoisseur by Hugh Kelsey  

Sharpen Your Bridge Technique by Hugh Kelsey

The Bedside Book of Bridge by Elena Jeronimidis

More Bedside Bridge by Elena Jeronimidis

Over Hoffman’s Shoulder by Martin Hoffman and Marc Smith

Expert Defence by Raymond Brock

Defend With Your Life by Terence Reese and Eddie Kantar

Duplicate Bridge at Home by Mark Horton and Fred Gitelman

bridge book reviews page 8 :

Better Rebidding with Bergen by Marty Bergen

To Open or Not To Open by Marty Bergen

Classic Kantar by Eddie Kantar

Kantar on Kontract by Eddie Kantar

Modern Bridge Defense by Eddie Kantar

Advanced Bridge Defense by Eddie Kantar

A New Approach to Play and Defense Vol 1 by Eddie Kantar

A New Approach to Play and Defense Vol 2 by Eddie Kantar

Take Your Tricks by Eddie Kantar

A Treasury of Bridge Tips by Eddie Kantar

Introduction to Declarer’s Play by Eddie Kantar’s

Introduction to Defender’s Play by Eddie Kantar’s

Topics in Declarer Play at Bridge  by Eddie Kantar

Bridge Conventions by Eddie Kantar

Defensive bridge Play Complete by Eddie Kantar

Kantar for the Defense by Eddie Kantar

All 52 Cards by Marshall Miles

The Best of Bridge Today Digest by Matthew and Pamela Granovetter

Famous Bidding Decisions by Terence Reese and David Bird

Famous Play Decisions by Terence Reese and David Bird

Famous Bridge Records by David Bird and Nikos Sarantakos

Famous Bridge Disasters by David Bird

Famous Leads and Defences by David Bird

Positive Declarer Play by Terence Reese and Julian Pottage

Positive Defence by Terence Reese and Julian Pottage

The Extra Edge in Play at Bridge  by Terence Reese and Julian Pottage

The Golden Rules of Declarer Play by Julian Pottage and Marc Smith

The Golden Rules of Constructive Bidding by Julian Pottage and Marc Smith

The Golden Rules for Rubber Bridge Players by Julian Pottage

The Golden Rules Of Opening Leads by Julian Pottage

World Class by Marc Smith

Master Class by Fred Gitelman

bridge book reviews page 9 :

Plan the Play by Dave Huggett and Stephen Cashmore

Victor Mollo’s Bridge Club by Victor Mollo

Win the Big Match by Julian Pottage

Easy Guide to Defensive Signals at Bridge by Julian Pottage

Play with the Champions by Ron Klinger

It’s Your Call by Brian Senior

A Bridge to Simple Squeezes by Julian Laderman

The Encyclopedia of Card Play Techniques at Bridge by Guy Levé

The Elusive Masterpoint by Carl Vancelette

Improve Your Bidding and Play by Derek Rimington

Inferences at Bridge by Marshall Miles

Improve your Bidding Judgement by Neil Kimelman

Kelsey on Squeeze Play by Hugh Kelsey

Test Your Play As Declarer by Paul Lukacs and Jeff Rubens

Bridge Without a Partner by Ken Eichenbaum

bridge book reviews page 10 :

Play Bridge at Home by Tony Forrester 

Improve Your Bridge at Home by Tony Forrester

Winning Bridge at Home by Tony Forrester

The Bridge Player’s Bedside Book by Tony Forrester

Secrets of Success by Tony Forrester

Bridge Master Versus Bridge Amateur by Mark Horton

Test Your Match Play by Hugh Walter Kelsey

The Tough Game by Hugh Walter Kelsey

The Needle Match by Hugh Walter Kelsey

365 Winning Bridge Tips by Danny Kleinman

How Good is your Bridge? by Danny Roth

Opening Leads by Robert E Ewen

Complete Book of Opening Leads by Easley Blackwood

Michael Lawrence’s opening Leads by Michael Lawrence

Thinking About IMPs by John Boeder

Psychic Bidding (and its Pitfalls) by Julian Pottage

Northern Lights by Ray and Linda Lee

Card Play Fundamentals by Easley Blackwood

Playing to win at bridge: Practical problems for the improving player by Ron Klinger

The Times Book of Bridge volumes 1 by Robert Sheehan

The Times Book of Bridge volumes 2 by Robert Sheehan

The Magic of Bridge by Tim Bourke and David Bird

Card Placing For You by Andrew Kambities

Partnership Defense in Bridge by Kit Woolsey

bridge book reviews page 11 :

Card Play Technique by Victor Mollo and Nico Gardener

Suit Contracts by Brian Senior

No Trump Contracts by David Bird

Defensive Plays by Sally Brock

How to Read Your Opponent’s Cards by Mike Lawrence

Building a Bidding System by Roy Hughes

The No Trump Zone by Danny Kleinman

The Winning Edge by Jeremy Flint

Play These Hands with Brian Senior by Brian Senior

Play These Hands With Me by Terence Reese

Misplay Theses Hands With Me by Mark Horton

Do You Really Want to Win at Bridge by Terence Reese

Play Bridge With Reese by Terrence Reese

Reese on Play by Terence Reese

Defensive Bridge Play Complete: The Definitive Guide by William S Root

The Great Bridge Scandal: The Most Famous Cheating Case in the History of the Game by Alan Truscott

Story of an Accusation by Terence Reese

bridge book reviews page 12 :

Standard Bridge Bidding for the 21st century by Max Hardy

Advanced Bridge Bidding for the 21st Century by Max Hardy

Cue Bidding At Bridge: A Modern Approach by Ken Rexford

Cue Bidding to Slams by Ron Klinger

The Pocket Guide to two-over-one by Paul Thurston

25 Steps to Learning 2/1 by Paul Thurston

Two Over One Game Force by Max Hardy

Competitive Bidding with Two Suited Hands by Max Hardy

Workbook on the Two-Over-One System by Mike Lawrence

Two-Over-One Game Force by Max Hardy and Steve Bruno

Two-Over-One Game Force Bidding Problems No.1: Responses When Responder Has a Fit With Opener’s One Heart or One Spade Bid by J. N. Larone .

The Flannery Two Diamond Opening by Bill Flannery

Helms to Hello by Jerry Helms

Standard American 21 by John Thomas

bridge book reviews page 13 :

Spingold Challenge by Allan Falk

Team Trial by Allan Falk 

Bermuda Bowl Challange by Allan Falk

Spot the Bridge Writer’s Blunder by Danny Roth

Beat the Experts at Bridge by Danny Roth

Falsecards by Mike Lawrence

Winning Card Play by Hugh Kelsey

Case For the Defence by Victor Mollo

The Best of Gray by Robert Gray and Raymond Brock

Killing Defence at Bridge by Hugh Kelsey

More Killing Defence at Bridge by Hugh Kelsey

Modern Bridge Conventions by William S Root and Richard Pavlicek

Bridge Conventions Complete by Amalya Kearse

Conventions at a Glance by Matthew and Pamela Granovetter

Bridge Conventions for You by Ron Klinger and Andrew Kambites

Bridge Conventions, Defences and Countermeasures by Ron Klinger

5-Card Major Stayman by Ron Klinger

Conventional Bidding Explained by Freddie North

DONT – Distrubing Opponents’ No Trump by Michael Lawrence.

The Lebensohl convention complete in contract bridge by Ron Andersen

New Minor, Fourth Suit, Forcing Notrump Responses by Max Hardy

Splinters and Other Shortness Bids by Max Hardy

Bridge Conventions – Defending Against Pre-Empts by Brian Senior

Bridge Pointers and Tests by Milton C Work

bridge book reviews page 14 :

Tournament ACOL by David Bird and Tim Bourke

Bridge with Brunner – ACOL Bidding for Budding Experts by Michelle Brunner  

Precision Bidding in Acol by Eric Crowhurst

Acol in Competition by Eric Crowhurst

Acol Index by Eric Crowhurst

Understanding ACOL by Eric Crowhurst and Andrew Kambites

Negative Doubles for Acol Players Marty Bergen and Tim Bourke

How I Became a Life Master Playing the Weak NoTrump by Eric von der Luft

The Weak No Trump – How to Play It, How to Play Against It by Andy Stark

Understanding the Uncontested Auction by Ron Klinger and Andrew Kambites

Understanding the Contested Auction by Ron Klinger and Andrew Kambites

25 Bridge Conventions for Acol Players by Sandra Landy, Mark Horton & Barbara Seagram

Guide to Better Acol Bridge by Ron Klinger  

Tips for Better Bridge by Bernard Magee

Acol Bridge Made Easy by Ron Klinger  

Step-By-Step Constructive Bidding by Tony Sowter

The Right Way to Play Bridge by Paul Mendelson

Power Acol by Ron Klinger 

Acol Bridge Flipper by Ron Klinger

Bridge is an Easy Game by Ian Macleod

Bridge is Still an Easy Game by Ian Macleod

New Instant Guide to Bridge by Hugh Kelsey and Ron Klinger

Acol Bridge for Bright Beginners by Hugh Kelsey and Andrew Kambites

Acol Bridge for Bright Improvers by Hugh Kelsey and Andrew Kambites

Anyone for Bridge by Paul Wokes

Don’t be a Dummy at Bridge by Derek Gittins

Acol in the 90’s by Terence Reese and David Bird

Improve Your Bridge by Amanda Hawthorne and Mark Horton

Bridge: Light Up Your Understanding of Bidding by William J. August

bridge book reviews page 15 : we start with a series oif four books by Ron Klinger and Andrew Kambites  titled Card Play Made Easy:

Vol 1: Safety Plays and Endplays

Vol 2: Know Your Suit Combinations 

Vol 3: Trump Management

Vol 4: Timing and Communications

Logical Bridge Play by Hugh Kelsey 

Bridge Odds For Practical Players by Hugh Kelsey

Bridge Baron Companion by Donald Farewell and Jason Rosenfild 

Double Trouble: All About Doubles by Sally Horton

Wielding the Axe by Augie Boehm

The Complete Book on Take Out Doubles by Mike Lawrence

The Complete Guide to Contested Auctions by Mike Lawrence

The Complete guide to Passed hand Bidding by Mike Lawrence

The Complete Book on Balancing in Contract Bridge by Mike Lawrence 

Partnership Understandings by Mike Lawrence 

Partnership Bidding by Mary Paul 

Partnership Defense in Bridge by Kit Woolsey 

Winning Defense for the Advancing Bridge Player: More Constructive Thinking at the Bridge Table by Frank Stewart

Dynamic Defense by Mike Lawrence

How to Play Card Combinations by Mike Lawrence

Suit Combinations in Bridge by Sally Brock 

Play Bridge with Mike Lawrence by Mike Lawrence

Play Swiss Teams with Mike Lawrence by Mike Lawrence

Mike Lawrence’s Bidding Quizzes I: The Uncontested Auction by Mike Lawrence

Better Bridge for the Advancing Player by Frank Stewart 

Bridge Hands to Make You Laugh and Cry by David Bird and Nikos Sarantakos

Cook and Deal by Dorothy Cook

Vulnerable in Hearts – A Memoir of Fathers, Sons and Contract Bridge by Sandy Balfour 

The New York Times bridge Book by Alan and Dorothy Truscott

Bridge My Way by Zia Mahmood is 

Bridge is My Game by Charles Goren

bridge book reviews page 16 :

Stayman Auctions by Barbara Seagram and Linda Lee

Jacoby Transfers by Barbara Seagram and Andy Stark

Four-Suit Transfers by Barbara Seagram and Andy Stark

Jacoby 2NT by Barbara Seagram and Linda Lee

Splinter Bids by Barbara Seagram and Linda Lee

Roman Keycard Blackwood by Barbara Seagram and Linda Lee

Improve Your Game – 50 bridge Puzzles by Paul Lamford 

Three NoTrumps in Depth by Augie Boehm

Winning Swiss Team Tactics in Bridge by Harry Feldheim 

The Modern Losing Trick Count by Ron Klinger

When to Bid, When to Pass by Ron Klinger

Commonsense Bidding by William S Root

How to Play a Bridge Hand by William S Root

How to Defend a Bridge Hand by William S Root

Squeeze Play made Easy by Terence Reese and Patrick Jordain

Control the Bidding by Paul Mendelson

Ron Klinger Answers Your Bridge Queries by Ron Klinger

Ron Klinger’s Master Class by Ron Klinger

Bridge is Fun by Ron Klinger

Duplicate Bridge Flipper by Ron Klinger

Guide to Better Duplicate Bridge by Ron Klinger

How Good is Your Bridge Hand? by Andrew Kambites and Ron Klinger

bridge book reviews page 17 :

Learn from the Stars by Mark Horton and Tony Sowter

Bridge: The Vital Principles by Freddie North

Judgment at Bridge by Mike Lawrence

The Complete Book on Overcalls in Contract Bridge by Mike Lawrence

Defend These Hands With Me by Julian Pottage

Clues from the Bidding by Julian pottage

Play or Defend by Julian Pottage

Bridge Problems for a New Millennium by Julian Pottage

First Principles of Card Play by Paul Marston

Bridge My Way by Zia Mahmood

Bridge, Zia… and Me by Michael Rosenberg

Becoming a Bridge Expert by Frank Stewart

Bermuda Bowl by Henry Francis and Brian Senior

Modernizing Your Bridge Bidding by Gerald Olsen 

The Tao of Bridge by Brent Manley

On Bidding by Alan Truscott and Philip Alder

Play Cards with Tim Seres by Tim Seres 

bridge book reviews page 18 :

Teach Yourself Better Bridge by David Bird 

Test Your Bridge Play, Vol 1 by Eddie Kantar 

Test Your Bridge Play, Vol 2 by Eddie Kantar 

Secrets of Expert Defence by David Bird and Tony Forrester

Modern Constructive Bidding Marshall Miles

Competitive Bidding in the 21st Century Marshall Miles

My System: The Unbalanced Diamond by Marshall Miles

Dormer on Deduction by Albert Dormer

50 Winning Duplicate Bridge Tips for the Improver by Ron Klinger

50 More Winning Bridge Tips by Ron Klinger

The Game of Bridge by Terence Reese

The Bridge World’s: Test Your Play by Jeff Rubens

For Love or Money by Mark Horton and Brian Senior

Bridge for Money by David Bird and Martin Hoffman

The Official Encyclopedia of Bridge edited by Henry Francis

Matchpoint Defense by Jim Priebe

The Bidding Dictionary by Alan Truscott

Why Women Lose at Bridge by Joyce Nicholson

Why Women Win at Bridge by Daniel Roth

Matchpoints by Kit Woolsey

Match-Point Bridge by Hugh Kelsey

bridge book reviews page 19 :

How the Experts Win at Bridge by Burt and Lynn Hall

The Power of Shape by Ron Klinger

Guide to Better Card Play by Ron Klinger

Focus on Bidding by Danny Roth

Focus on Defense by Danny Roth

Focus on Declarer Play by Danny Roth

Plan Before You Play by Howard Ringel

Bridge Endplays for Everyone, Including You by David Bird

The Fun Way to Better Bridge by Harry Lampert

The Fun Way to Serious Bridge by Harry Lampert

The Fun Way to Advanced Bridge by Harry Lampert

The Art of Card Reading at Bridge by Fred Karpin

Bridge Strategy at Trick One by Fred Karpin

The Most Puzzling Situations in Bridge Play by Terence Reese

The New Complete Book of Bridge by Albert Dormer and Ron Klinger

Collins Need to Know? Bridge by Andrew Robson

Better Bridge With a Better Memory by Ron Klinger

Bridge Play Unravelled by Freddie North

The Bridge Player’s Bible by Juliam Pottage

Omar Sharif Talks Bridge by Omar Sharif and David Bird

Play More Bridge with Omar Sharif by Omar Sharif

bridge book reviews page 20 :

Win the Bermuda Bowl with Me by Jeff Meckstroth

Easier Tone than Said by Prakash K. Paranjape

Things Your Bridge Teacher Won’t Tell You by Dan Romm

How You Can Play Like an Expert by Mel Colchamiro

Spotlight on Card Play by Robert Darvas and Paul Lukacs

Pathways to Better Bridge Defense by Danny Roth

Step By Step Signalling by Mark Horton

Step By Step Discarding by Danny Roth

Step by Step Pre-empts by Alan Mould

Step by Step Cardplay in No Trumps by Robert Berthe and Norbert Lebely

Step By Step Planning the Defence by Raymond Brock

Step by Step Slam Bidding by Alan Mould

Tales from the Bridge Table by John Clay

Secrets of Winning Bridge by Jeff Rubens

The Complete Book on Hand Evaluation by Mike Lawrence

Hand Evaluation in Bridge by Brian Senior

Bridge Squeezes Complete by Clyde Elton Love

The Mammoth Book of Bridge by Mark Horton

Winning Contract Bridge by Edgar Kaplan

The Losing Trick Count: A Book of Bridge Technique by Dudley Courtenay

Imagination and Technique at the Bridge Table by Patrick Jourdain and Martin Hoffman

Bridge Master: The Best Of Edgar Kaplan by Edgar Kaplan

Stronger Competitive Bidding by Marshall Miles

Man vs Machine – The Bridge Match of the Millennium by Marc Smith and Zia Mahmood

bridge book reviews page 21 :

The Mistakes You Make at Bridge by Terence Reese and Roger Trezel

Blocking and Unblocking by Terence Reese and Roger Trezel

Yhe Art of Defence in Bridge by Terence Reese and Roger Trezel

When to Duck, When to Win by Terence Reese and Roger Trezel

Safety Plays in bridge by Terence Reese and Roger Trezel

Master the Odds in Bridge by Terence Reese and Roger Trezel

Snares and Swindles in Bridge by Terence Reese and Roger Trezel

Elimination Play in Bridge by Terence Reese and Roger Trezel

The Bridge Magicians by Mark Horton and Radoslaw Kielbasinski

Card by Card: Adventures at the Bridge Table by Roy Hughes

Thinking on Defense by Jim Priebe

Challenge Your Declarer Play by Danny Roth

The Backwash Squeeze and Other Improbable Feats by Edward McPherson

The Lone Wolff: Autobiography of a Bridge Maverick by Bobby Wolff

Victor Mollo’s Bridge Quiz Book by Victor Mollo

I Challenge You by Victor Mollo

Card Reading; The Art of Guessing Right at the Bridge Table by by Eric Jannersten

Play Safe and Win by Eric Jannersten

Psychological Strategy in Contract Bridge by Fred Karpin

More Deadly Than the Male by Rixi Markus

Instant Guide to Standard Bridge by Hugh Kelsey and Ron Klinger

Bridge Play Unravelled by Freddie North

Bridge: The Bidder’s Game by George Rosenkranz

bridge book reviews page 22 :

Bidding Challenge by Larry Cohen

Countdown to Winning Bridge by Tim Bourke and Marc Smith

Negative Doubles by Marty Bergen

Hand Evaluation by Marty Bergen

10 Ways to Improve Your Bridge by David Bird

Introduction to the Law by Larry Cohen

There Must be a Way by Andrew Diosy

You Have to See This by Andrew Diosy and Linda Lee

Tips for Better Bridge by Bernard Magee

Why You Lose at Bridge by S.J. Simon

Cut for Partners by S.J.Simon

Better Signalling Now by Mark Horton

Bridge with the Blue Team by Pietro Forquet

Tactical Bidding or How to Wreak Havoc in the Auction for Fun and Profit by Harold Feldheim

Play Duplicate Bridge at Home by Rijk van der Krol

Bridge Cardplay: Attack and Defence by Marc Smith

The Big Game – Rubber Bridge in a London Club by Robert Sheehan

Go for the Gold: Becoming an ACBL Life Master by Burt Saxon

bridge book reviews page 23 :

The Basic American Bidding System by Chris Hasney and Jerry Pottier

The Intermediate American Bidding System by Chris Hasney and Jerry Pottier

The Advanced American Bidding System by Chris Hasney and Jerry Pottier

Improve Your Bridge Memory by Ron Klinger

Handbook of Winning Bridge by Edwin Silberstang,

Understanding Duplicate Pairs by Ron Klinger and Andrew Kambites

Understanding Slam Bidding by Ron Klinger and Andrew Kambites

Bridge: Triumphs and Disasters by Jose Le Dentu and Terence Reese

That Elusive Extra Trick by Terence Reese and David Bird

Raising Partner by Brian Senior

Clues to Winning Play: Detective Work in Bridge by Danny Roth

Play Your Cards Right: The Essential Strategies for Declarer and in Defence by Paul Mendelson

Everything you Always Wanted to Know About Trump Leads & Were not Afraid to Ask by George Rosenkranz

Bid to Win, Play for Pleasure by George Rosenkranz and Philip Alder

Bidding On Target by George Rosenkranz

All the Tricks by Helen Sobel

Test Your Bridge Judgement by Barry Rigal

Bergen’s Best Bridge Quizzes vol 1 by Marty Bergen

Bergen for the Defense – or How to Defeat More Contracts by Marty Begen

Winning Bridge – Trick By Trick by Ron Klinger

bridge book reviews page 24 :

Hocus Pocus by Erwin Brecher and Zia Mahmood

More Hocus Pocus by Erwin Brecher and Julian Pottage

Focus on Hocus Pocus by Erwin Brecher and Danny Roth

Forgive Me, Partner: The Guide to a Successful Partnership by Pamela and Matthew Granovetter

For Experts Only: Selected Essays on Bridge by Matthew and Pamela Granovetter

Winning Bridge Intangibles by Mike Lawrence

Signals and Discards for You by Andrew Kambites

Awareness: The Way to Improve Your Bridge by Danny Roth

Collins Bridge Quiz Book by Bernard Magee

The Expert Beginner by Danny Roth

The Expert Improver by Danny Roth

The Expert Advencer by Danny Roth

The Expert Club Player by Danny Roth

How to Survive Your First bridge Tournament by David Burn

Helgemo’s World of Bridge: A Maestro Reveals His Secrets by Geir Helgemo

Bridge With Imagination by Geir Helgemo and David Bird

The Golden Age of Contract Bridge by David Daniels

The Hidden Side of Bridge by Terence Reese and David Bird

100 Tips For Better Bridge by Paul Mendelson

Vintage Forrester: Selected Writings from the Daily Telegraph by Tony Forrester 

Bergen’s Best Bridge Tips – Read Today, Win Tomorrow by Marty Bergen

Suit Combinations In Bridge by Sally Brock

Movements – A Fair Approach by Hans-Olof Hallen, Olof Hanner and Per Jannersten

Bridge Director’s Companion by Larry Harris

Duplicate Bridge Direction – A Complete Handbook by Alex Groner

Tips For Tops by George Rosenkranz 

More Tips For Tops by George Rosenkranz

With Open Cards, 110 Double-Dummy Problems by Eric Jannersten 

bridge book reviews page 25 :

Bridge Technique Series by David Bird and Marc Smith

Test Your Bridge Technique Series by David Bird and Tim Bourke

bridge book reviews page 26 :

The bridge book reviews on this page are all from the “Bridge Plus Practice Series” by various, mainly UK, bridge authors.

bridge book reviews page 27 :

Bridge Player’s Dictionary by Terence Reese.

Bridge Player’s Dictionary by Randall Baron.

Invitation to Annihilation by Mike Lipkin.

Bridge Play: How to win the most tricks whether trying to make a contract or set one by Alfred Sheinwold.

Clever Bridge Tricks by Brian Senior.

My Bridge and Yours by Frank Stewart.

Play of the Hand as Declarer and Defender by Shirley Silverman.

A Shortcut to Winning Bridge by Alfred Sheinwold.

Introduction to Defensive Bidding by Ronald P. Von Der Porten.

Foxy: Grandmaster of Bridge by G.C.H. Fox.

The Daily Telegraph Book of Bridge by G.C.H. Fox.

Second Daily Telegraph Book of Bridge  by G.C.H. Fox.

The Daily Telegraph Bridge Quiz  by G.C.H. Fox.

Second Daily Telegraph Bridge Quiz  by G.C.H. Fox.

The Defensive Bidding Quiz Book by David Ewen.

Winners and Losers at the Bridge Table by Bobby Goldman.

Easybridge! The Comic Book, plus books 2 and 3 by Edith McMullin.

The New Standard American Bridge Updated by Norma Sands

Playing the Cards: Developing Competence at the Bridge Table by Norma Sands.

Raising Your Bridge: Valuable Tips for Improving Players by Jim Kaplan

Bridge: Winning Ways to Play Your Cards by Paul Mendelson

bridge book reviews page 28 :

Bridge Without Error by Ron Klinger.

Creative Card Play by James Kauder.

Swiss Match Challenge by Jeff Rubens.

Mike Lawrence’s Bidding Quizzes 1: The Uncontested Auction by Mike Lawrence.

Major Suit Raises by Mike Lawrence.

The Jacoby and Texas Transfers Convention by Mike Lawrence.

Master Slam Bidding by Hugh Kelsey.

Slam Bidding by Hugh Walter Kelsey.

Psychological Strategy in Contract Bridge by Fred Karpin.

The Tricky Game, Deceptive Plays to Winning Bridge by Hugh Walter Kelsey.

Your Bridge Psychology by F. L. Holmes.

How to Improve Your Bridge by Hugh Kelsey.

The Fundamentals of Contract Bridge by Charles Goren.

Bridge is My Game by Charles Goren.

Play Bridge with Goren by Charles Goren.

Play Bridge with any Partner, Even a Strranger by Charles Goren.

Point Count Bidding in Contract Bridge by Charles H Goren.

Bridge Bidding by John Mallon with an introduction by Charles Goren.

Defensive Tips for Bad Card Holders by Eddie Kantar.

The American Forcing Minor by Joe Lutz and Jerold Fink.

Secrets of Expert Card Play by David Bird and Tony Forrester

Bidding a Bridge Hand by Terence Reese.

bridge book reviews page 29 :

Test Your Match Play by Hugh Kelsey.

 The Tough Game by Hugh Kelsey.

The Needle Match by Hugh Kelsey.

Challenge Match by Hugh Kelsey.

The Test Your Card Play series of books by Hugh Kelsey.

The First, Second, Third, Fourth series  of four books by Alfred Sheinwold 

bridge book reviews page 30:

Negative, Responsive and Other Competitive Doubles by Harry Feldheim is a 1993 revised edition of the classic that been expanded to include many of the latest expert treatmentsand includes lots of puzzles and examples.

Negative and Responsive Doubles in Bridge by Harry Feldheim a pamphlet that briefly describes these topics.

Blackwood on Slams by Easley Blackwood is an extensive book on the problems with slam bidding and playing.

Play it Again Sam by Terence Reese and Martin Hoffman is a collection of interesting hands that Reese has played or defended and explains how the non-expert and the expert played them.

Test Your Trump Control by Hugh Kelsey allows you to test your skill as declarer in a quiz that covers all aspects of trump control.

The “Bidding Precisely” series of four books by Katherine Wei and Ron Anderson is aimed at the intermediate – advanced player, the first two books being about the Precision system and the last two about general bidding.

The Polish Club by Greg Matula.

The Polish Club – WJ05 by Krzysztof Jassem.

Bridge Master: The Best of Edgar Kaplan by Edgar Kaplan.

Natural Therapy for Defense Disorders by Lajos Linczmayer.

Dear Billy by Billy Muller.

A Bridge Too Far? by Edna Murphy chronicles the first year of Tom Hanlon’s new life as a Bridge Professional.

Master Play in Contract Bridge by Terence Reese

bridge book reviews page 31 :

Gump: Accurate Bidding at Bridge for the Mildy Deranged by Tom Jordan

Squeezes, Coups and End plays by E Hall Downes.

Normal Bridge Bidding by Lawrence Kane.

A Vulnerable Game: The Memoirs of Rixi Markus by Rixi Marcus.

Bridge with the Professional Touch by Terence Reese

Aces Scientific by Bobby Goldman

Play Bridge with the Aces by Ira Corn Jr.

The Financial Times Book of Bridge by Derek Rimington and Patrick Cotter.

The Pairs Game by David Greenwood

Bridging the Gap by Peter Kichline

Play Bridge With Rookie by E Balt

Do You Know Your Partner? by Andrew Bernstein

Culbertson, The Man Who Made Contract Bridge by John Clay

No Passing Fancy: Fifty Years of Contract Bridge by Sue Emery

The Weak Two Bid in Bridge by Harold Feldheim

 

31

 beginner’s bridge book reviews page 1 :

The Club Series: Bidding in the 21st century by Audrey Grant

The Diamond Series: Play of the Hand in the 21st century by Audrey Grant

The Heart Series: Defense by Audrey Grant

The Spade Series: Commonly Used Conventions by Audrey Grant

The NoTrump Series: More Commonly Used Conventions by Audrey Grant

Elementary Bridge Five Card Major Student Text by Shirley Silverman

Intermediate Bridge Five Card Major Student Text by Shirley Silverman

Advanced & Duplicate Bridge Student Text by Shirley Silverman

Play of the Hand as Declarer & Defender by Shirley Silverman

Five Card Major Bridge Teachers Manual/With 4 Student texts by Shirley Silverman

Bridge Basics 1: An Introduction by Audrey Grant

Bridge Basics 2: Competitive Bidding by Audrey Grant

Bridge Basics 3: Popular Conventions by Audrey Grant

Improving Your Judgement 1: Opening the Bidding by Audrey Grant

Improving Your Judgement 2: Doubles by Audrey Grant

Bridge Made Easy Book 1 (Elementary) by Caroline Sydnor

Bridge Made Easy Book 2 (Intermediate) by Caroline Sydnor

Bridge Made Easy Book 3 (How To Win More Tricks) by Caroline Sydnor

Bridge Made Easy Book 4 (How To Set Your Opponents) by Caroline Sydnor

beginner’s bridge book reviews page 2 :

Five Weeks to Winning Bridge by Alfred Shei

Bridge in 3 Weeks by Alan Truscott

How to Play Winning Bridge by David Bird

The Pocket Guide to Bridge by Barbara Seagra

Goren’s New Bridge Complete by Charles H Goren

Bridge for Dummies by Eddie Kantar

4-3-2-1 Manual: The Ideal Student Textbook by Charles Michaels, Ruth Cohen and Shirley Silverman

Bridge Basics by Ron Klinger and Alan Truscott

Five-Card Majors by Ron Klinger

Basic Bridge by Ron Klinger and Andrew Kambites

Basic Bridge by Peter Arnold

Bridge Puzzles for Children by David Levin

Bridge for Beginners and Beyond by Karen Walker

Make a Start at Bridge by Terence Reese and David Bird

Teach Me to Play: A First Bridge Book by Jude Goodwin and Don Ellison

The Elements of Play by Ruth Cohen

No Trump Bidding

May 7, 2008

In the past three of four years there have been a number of books published about bidding after a 1NT opening.

The most advanced/complete of these books is undoubtably The Definitive Guide to Strong No Trump Bidding, Stayman and transfers.

Bridge links

May 4, 2008

Bridge abbreviations and terminology

Links

May 4, 2008

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